Thursday, July 8, 2010

Harvesting Dried Coriander

This week, we harvested some coriander. Coriander is ready when it turns brown. If it is still green, or not completely dry, it has a slightly bitter taste. The 100+° weather certainly dried the herb! The complete plant usually is brown when the coriander is ready for harvest.

Coriander is from the same plant as cilantro. Cilantro is the early flat leaf of the plant, not the fern like later leaf when the plant goes to seed. Coriander is the seed of the plant. If it stays on the plant too long, coriander will fall off and grow new cilantro plants.

Momma and I cut off some coriander with the stalks. I twisted the coriander off the stalks into a paper bag. I cleaned out the impurities by dumping handfuls of coriander down a paper towel into a container. The coriander rolled down, leaving most of the dirt and stems behind on the paper towel. We harvested a half pint full of coriander to use this winter!

3 comments:

  1. The paper towel method is smart! I have not harvested any coriander this year, just letting it drop. What are some recipes your family uses it in?

    I am going outside now to put some lime/flour on my tomatoes--hopefully it might help for the blossom end rot like you mentioned in your last post, but I mainly read about it to deter blister beetles! Have you heard of them? They are chewing away at my plants and I have never seen them before!

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  2. Hi Hannah!

    We normally use the coriander in curry chicken. I have never heard of blister beetles. Are they eating on all of your plants or just the tomatoes? I hope that the lime will help with the beetles as well!

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  3. Thanks for the response...the chicken sounds good. I tried using some coriander in a lentil rice pilaf recently and it turned out tasty.

    The blister beetles were mainly on the tomatoes, but there were also a bunch on the bolting Swiss Chard, which may have attracted them to the garden. So I removed it quickly! A few were on some beets too. they have calmed down some, thankfully, and the tomatoes are doing better.

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